So Rich, So Poor: Why Its So Hard to End Poverty in America

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online So Rich, So Poor: Why Its So Hard to End Poverty in America file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with So Rich, So Poor: Why Its So Hard to End Poverty in America book. Happy reading So Rich, So Poor: Why Its So Hard to End Poverty in America Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF So Rich, So Poor: Why Its So Hard to End Poverty in America at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF So Rich, So Poor: Why Its So Hard to End Poverty in America Pocket Guide.

Though there were statistics and facts to illustrate the number of people living in poverty and the percentage of Americans living below the poverty line at various times in history, I thought too much of the analysis was biased opinion. For example, when talking about education reform, he states that charter schools and Teach for America are positive steps but he doesn't cite any studies or research to support his opinion. Hmm - I detect bias here and it made me question some of the author's other conclusions.

This book mostly focused on inner city poverty. I would have been interested to hear more about poverty on reservations, rural poverty, veterans issues, and poverty due to mental illness. It seems that the solutions would be different and that perhaps many of the above programs might not provide relief for these subgroups. Jan 18, Kay rated it liked it Shelves: grad-school-reading-list. How can you not enjoy this delightful little nugget of a book? Edelman writes as an elder statesman, reflecting on his decades of experience in anti-poverty work.

This is a knowing, plain spoken account from the front lines of the War on Poverty and beyond. Some thoughts: 1 Edelman's approach isn't for everyone. A previous reviewer here on Goodreads noted that Edelman seems to select his best practices at random. I don't believe that's the case. He simply highlights the good work of those close How can you not enjoy this delightful little nugget of a book? He simply highlights the good work of those close to him. The book isn't light on data—the appendix's many Urban Institute citations makes this clear—but it is a more colloquial scan of the field.

Any of Edelman's sentences could be and likely already is the thesis statement for a full, page book. Why write two hundred pages on policy and program development, then situate the book in terms of mass movements like Occupy? All in all, this is a worthwhile read, both as an introduction for novices and as a pithy reflection for the well versed. Nov 13, Matt rated it really liked it Shelves: law , nonfiction , usa. This is a surprising book, it's almost a biography of the fight against poverty in this country, told by someone who's been through a good part of it.

Edelman does an excellent job using facts and figures to paint a none too pretty picture of poverty in the United States from the late s to the present day approximately Even if you don't agree with his proposed solutions, Edelman does a a great job of portraying the scope of the problem in a very human way. Numbers and statistics are This is a surprising book, it's almost a biography of the fight against poverty in this country, told by someone who's been through a good part of it. Numbers and statistics are provided to back everything up and it would be very easy for the book to rely so heavily on numbers that it becomes easy for the reader to forget that these are real people, but Edelman does a great job of keeping things grounded, and keeping the human element at the center.

Dec 06, Jennifer rated it liked it. This book did a good job of describing the problem of poverty in America and expressing the author's nostalgia for Bobby Kennedy. He makes the excellent point that the elderly are in poverty in far fewer numbers than families with children because the elderly vote and children can't.

The great recession disproportionally hurt minorities and families with children.

Post navigation

He also highlights that low wage jobs have proliferated in the last 40 years as a proportion of available jobs. The solutions he put This book did a good job of describing the problem of poverty in America and expressing the author's nostalgia for Bobby Kennedy. The solutions he puts forth to the ongoing, entrenched poverty in our nation didn't feel realistic, especially in the current political climate.

Dec 28, Kristi rated it really liked it. An incredibly helpful historical review of the economics and social drivers of current public assistance programs. I have a better understanding of the reasons why things are as they are and can understand the logic. The federal government wants to reduce the amount of people living in poverty and extreme poverty by providing tax benefits and public assistance to compliment faith based and nonprofit outreach. Still want more understanding about the generational nature of poverty, but these kinds An incredibly helpful historical review of the economics and social drivers of current public assistance programs.

Still want more understanding about the generational nature of poverty, but these kinds of readings help paint a picture. Apr 20, May rated it liked it Shelves: books-i-own , current-ish-events , social-science , textbooks , non-fiction , recommended-for-everyone. Definitely a worthwhile read and makes some critical points; I'm only giving it three stars because I think Edelman still falls into that progressive liberal trap that doesn't question very basic ideas that have been ingrained in our mis understanding of society, like the horror the horror!

I just wish honest critical thinking wasn't hampered by a need to appeal to so-called moderates that have bought in to enough capitalist propaganda to immediately throw out anythi Definitely a worthwhile read and makes some critical points; I'm only giving it three stars because I think Edelman still falls into that progressive liberal trap that doesn't question very basic ideas that have been ingrained in our mis understanding of society, like the horror the horror!

I just wish honest critical thinking wasn't hampered by a need to appeal to so-called moderates that have bought in to enough capitalist propaganda to immediately throw out anything that doesn't mesh with their current, essentialist understanding of states and economies. Oct 24, Garhunt rated it really liked it. This writer's personal history allows him to provide an analysis stretching back to the emergence of USA's Great Society.

He provides a liberal along the lines of John Galbraith perspective of poverty and its solutions. This is not unwelcome given the dominance of neoliberalism and the assault on modern welfare state. Jan 30, Darlene Robert rated it it was amazing. This book should be read by everyone who has not "given up" on America. The premies that America is a country of second chances rang true for me. A late bloomer I was a poor achiever in high school but returned to community college at 25 and now have a DSW. We as a country need to continue to provide second chances to all citizens so that a living wage is available to all.

Dec 21, Naomi rated it really liked it Shelves: community , ethics , current-events. Edelman's examination of poverty in America is thorough, and shares some hopes as well as bleak reality. This is necessary reading for folks who want to address poverty with community and legislative change. Recommended for groups organizing their communities. Jun 30, Mikaela rated it really liked it Shelves: current-events.

So Rich, So Poor by Peter Edelman Essay - Words | Bartleby

A short, but good analysis. As someone who was familiar with the basics, this book provided enough detail to make it interesting and informative while still capable of functioning as an introduction to U. Jan 07, Phil Goerner rated it it was ok. Had to turn this book back to the library. It had a good start, but I couldn't keep up the momentum. Oh well, on to other books! Sep 17, Greta rated it liked it. It is hard for the reader to catch up with his asides and follow the sentences through.

Needs an editor. Jun 19, Amanda Wehrman rated it really liked it. Edelmen does an excellent job of isolating the seemingly intractable causes of poverty in the United States. Jul 27, Adelle Eslinger rated it it was amazing. An important look at issues which cannot be swept under the rug: poverty, unemployment and the potential power of the people. I also recommend Mr. Edelman's interview with Bill Moyers.

Oct 09, Sheris rated it it was amazing Shelves: the-world-as-it-is , policy-knowledge , governing , political-economy. Important and highly relevant. Dec 21, CBW Librarian rated it it was amazing Shelves: nonfiction , poverty , politics , economics , social-welfare. Examines the history of poverty in the U. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book perfectly summarized the past. Jul 30, Bill added it.

A brief introduction to poverty in America and what has worked well and what has failed in our fight against it. Well written but I found myself wanting a bit more substance. Jun 09, JFN rated it liked it. Eric M. A World of Three Zeros. Muhammad Yunus. The Geneva Consensus. Pascal Lamy. Beryl A. Congress and Policy Making in the 21st Century. Jeffery A. Portfolios of the Poor. Daryl Collins. Shopfloor Matters.

You are here

David Fairris. Automating Inequality. Virginia Eubanks. The False Promise of Big Government. Patrick M. American Dream. Jason DeParle. Boom Towns. Stephen J. David Cay Johnston. Global Leadership in Transition.


  • Lie Groups: Structure, Actions, and Representations: In Honor of Joseph A. Wolf on the Occasion of his 75th Birthday.
  • Knowing If Its the Real Thing: Discovering the Roots of Intimacy?
  • Related Articles.
  • Silicon-on-Sapphire Circuits and Systems: Sensor and Biosensor Interfaces.
  • Questions??
  • Peter Edelman discusses "So Rich, So Poor: Why It's So Hard to End Poverty in America".

Colin I. Competitive Interests. Thomas T. Be Outraged. Richard Jolly. Lobbying America. Benjamin C. Sweet Charity? Janet Poppendieck. Flat Broke with Children. Sharon Hays. Advanced Introduction to Public Choice. Randall G. Michael Fabricant. Rothschild Buildings. Jerry White. Trapped in America's Safety Net. Andrea Louise Campbell. Path To Progress. Charles Moor. Trading Barriers. Margaret Peters. Making Volunteers. Nina Eliasoph. Tides of Consent. James A. The Financial Diaries. Jonathan Morduch.

Department of History

Trade, Poverty, Development. Rorden Wilkinson. Within Our Reach. Lisbeth Schorr. Thirty Tomorrows. Milton Ezrati. The Right Talk. Mark A. Storming Caesars Palace. Annelise Orleck. The Great National Divides. Paul Brakke. Looking Away. Harsh Mander. Early Intervention. James Hughes. Marc Sommers. Susan Sheehan. Building Red America. Thomas B. Transatlantic Free Trade. Fredrik Erixon. Financial Systems in Developing Economies. Robert M. The New Middle Class. Steve Gunderson. Urban Policy Reconsidered.

Stephen McGovern. Attaining Access for All. Asian Development Bank. Akiko Maeda. The Next Agenda. Robert L.

Peter Edelman: How Did America Get So Poor?

Searching for America's Heart. Peter Edelman. How to write a great review. The review must be at least 50 characters long. The title should be at least 4 characters long. Your display name should be at least 2 characters long. At Kobo, we try to ensure that published reviews do not contain rude or profane language, spoilers, or any of our reviewer's personal information. You submitted the following rating and review. We'll publish them on our site once we've reviewed them. Continue shopping. Item s unavailable for purchase. Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item s now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.

Remove FREE.



admin