Children and Young People Who Sexually Abuse Others: Current Developments and Practice Responses

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Since moving to England in , she has worked for Dorset County Council and Bournemouth Borough Council, initially in a long term child care field work team and subsequently as a senior practitioner on a specialist team, working with children and young people who sexually harm, as well as undertaking specialist family risk assessments, where the primary cause for concern related to issues of sexual abuse.

Within this role she also undertook work relating to personal safety skills. In Lindsey began working at the NSPCC in Dorset, initially on a three year basis to develop the service in respect of working with young people who sexually harm, and then on a permanent basis, to continue working with children and their families where sexually harmful behaviour was the concern.

Whilst in this role she also undertook work with adults who sexually harmed as well as work with their partners. She also undertook independent family risk assessments, where the cause for concern may have related to any form of child abuse. In her role she was a consultant from — to a residential unit for young males who displayed sexually harmful behaviour.

She has facilitated training and consultation with local authorities, and taken the lead in developmental aspects of the service within the team. From — she was also acting manager on the team on a part time basis. She remained with the NSPCC for a period of 12 years, until December at which time, due to restructuring within the organisation, the team was closed. Lindsey co-founded D G Etali Ltd, in January , where she is currently director and specialist social worker and independent trainer.

She was seconded out of Probation between to manage and deliver the services of Project Dyfodol delivering counselling services to adults who had been, or where still in the Criminal Justice System, who had experienced some form of trauma , mainly sexual abuse. Due to lack of continuing funding for the project, she returned to Probation in She is presently in the process of establishing her own private counselling practice focusing upon developing Nature as Co therapist and the use of Equines in Therapy as part of her practice. She initially worked as a social worker on an adult mental health team, before moving to work on a child care assessment team, initially in Bournemouth and then in Poole.

The primary focus of her work was undertaking Joint Investigations now Best Evidence Interviews with the Police, when allegations of child abuse were made. Whilst working in Poole she was seconded for an 18 month period into Policy, focussing specifically on policies regarding ethnicity and diversity matters. Within this role she facilitated training for the Borough in relation to child protection and diversity.

In she became an accredited practice teacher. In she began working at the NSPCC in Dorset, working with adults who sexually harm, as well as undertaking work with their partners.

She has been accredited by the Home Office to facilitate the Thames Valley Sex Offender Treatment Programme, a group work programme for men who have committed sexually abusive acts against children and adults. Within this she has also been accredited to run the Internet Offender Programme and she has also run the Partner Programme.

1800RESPECT - Trauma Informed Understanding and Responses to Children Affected by Family Violence

She is an accredited treatment manager, and has been involved in supervising other colleagues running the programme. She has facilitated training and consultation with local agencies and has been instrumental in developing various aspects within the team. Within her role she also undertook work with young people who sexually harm.

Within her role at the NSPCC she also undertook independent family risk assessments, focussing on all aspects of child abuse. She remained with the NSPCC for nine years, until the team closure in December , due to organisational restructuring. Jacinta co-founded D G Etali Ltd, in January , where she is currently director and specialist social worker and independent trainer. Julia Kent. Julia has worked in education for more than 28 years as a secondary school teacher, a behaviour support teacher, a Designated Safeguarding Lead DSL and, most recently, as a local authority advisory teacher specialising in support for children and young people with Social, Emotional and Mental Health difficulties SEMH.

Julia held a range of responsibilities, including managing a team that delivered support in schools for children and young people with SEMH and a team of specialist restorative practitioners. Currently Julia works as a trainer for the AIM Project providing training for education settings to respond to and manage HSB in children and young people. Fight for a Fair Start Demand perinatal mental health support for every mum, so that every baby and every family gets a fair start. Child protection in the UK Legal definitions of a child and their rights Parental mental health Parental substance misuse.

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5.11.3 Harmful Sexual Behaviours Presented by Children and Young People

Help us protect a generation Help protect the children in your life and support our work by joining our PANTS campaign. Enter search term and hit 'enter'. Call the NSPCC helpline If you're worried about a child, even if you're unsure, contact our professional counsellors for help, advice and support. Home Preventing abuse Keeping children safe Healthy sexual behaviour. Healthy sexual behaviour Your guide to keeping children safe, spotting warning signs and what to do if you're worried.

The stages of normal sexual behaviour There are 4 phases of childhood sexual development. Infancy from 0 to 4 years. Even at this stage, sexual behaviour is beginning to emerge through actions like: kissing and hugging showing curiosity about private body parts talking about private body parts and using words like poo, willy and bum playing "house" or "doctors and nurses" type games with other children touching, rubbing or showing off their genitals or masturbating as a comforting habit.

Young children from 5 to 9 years. As children get a little older they become more aware of the need for privacy while also: kissing and hugging showing curiosity about private body parts but respecting privacy talking about private body parts and sometimes showing them off trying to shock by using words like poo, willy and bum using swear and sex words they've heard other people say playing "house" or "doctors and nurses" type games with other children touching, rubbing or showing others their private parts.

Pre-adolescents from 10 to 12 years. Adolescents from 13 to 16 years. As puberty kicks in, sexual behaviour becomes more private with: kissing, hugging, dating and forming longer-lasting relationships being interested in and asking questions about body parts, relationships and sexuality using sexual language and talking about sex with friends looking for sexual pictures or online porn masturbating in private and experimenting sexually with the same age group.

How to react to sexualised behaviour Learning about sex and sexual behaviour is a normal part of a child's development. The way you respond is important If you're too disapproving or imply that sex shouldn't be spoken about then your child may be less likely to come to you with any questions or worries they might have. Warning signs that something's not right Sexualised behaviour which is significantly more advanced than you'd normally expect for a child of a particular age or which shows a lack of inhibition, could be a cause for concern.

Other warning signs include: sexual interest in adults or children of very different ages to their own forceful or aggressive sexual behaviour compulsive habits reports from school that their behaviour is affecting their progress and achievement. Try these tips: Tell them that they can always talk to you about sex, and try to have ongoing conversations. Look at what may have caused the behaviour. Is there a family member who may have been an influence? Have they been looking at unsuitable websites, music videos or computer games?

Find out about online safety and what blocks or parental controls you can put on computers, tablets and phones. Talking about sex and consent Start talking early. Home Preventing abuse Keeping children safe Healthy sexual behaviour. Healthy sexual behaviour Your guide to keeping children safe, spotting warning signs and what to do if you're worried. The stages of normal sexual behaviour There are 4 phases of childhood sexual development. Infancy from 0 to 4 years.

NSPCC Library Online

Even at this stage, sexual behaviour is beginning to emerge through actions like: kissing and hugging showing curiosity about private body parts talking about private body parts and using words like poo, willy and bum playing "house" or "doctors and nurses" type games with other children touching, rubbing or showing off their genitals or masturbating as a comforting habit. Young children from 5 to 9 years.

As children get a little older they become more aware of the need for privacy while also: kissing and hugging showing curiosity about private body parts but respecting privacy talking about private body parts and sometimes showing them off trying to shock by using words like poo, willy and bum using swear and sex words they've heard other people say playing "house" or "doctors and nurses" type games with other children touching, rubbing or showing others their private parts.

Pre-adolescents from 10 to 12 years. Adolescents from 13 to 16 years. As puberty kicks in, sexual behaviour becomes more private with: kissing, hugging, dating and forming longer-lasting relationships being interested in and asking questions about body parts, relationships and sexuality using sexual language and talking about sex with friends looking for sexual pictures or online porn masturbating in private and experimenting sexually with the same age group.

How to react to sexualised behaviour Learning about sex and sexual behaviour is a normal part of a child's development.

The way you respond is important If you're too disapproving or imply that sex shouldn't be spoken about then your child may be less likely to come to you with any questions or worries they might have. Warning signs that something's not right Sexualised behaviour which is significantly more advanced than you'd normally expect for a child of a particular age or which shows a lack of inhibition, could be a cause for concern. Other warning signs include: sexual interest in adults or children of very different ages to their own forceful or aggressive sexual behaviour compulsive habits reports from school that their behaviour is affecting their progress and achievement.

Try these tips: Tell them that they can always talk to you about sex, and try to have ongoing conversations. Look at what may have caused the behaviour. Is there a family member who may have been an influence? Have they been looking at unsuitable websites, music videos or computer games? Find out about online safety and what blocks or parental controls you can put on computers, tablets and phones. Talking about sex and consent Start talking early.

You could try: having short, informal chats now and again using everyday situations to strike up the conversation, such as seeing a pregnant woman or discussing stories in the media using humour if it makes it easier. Safe sex. Consent and the law. Talking about difficult topics There are lots of ways to make it a bit less painful for you both when it comes time to talk about a 'difficult' subject. Healthy and unhealthy relationships Lots of young people contact Childline about their relationships.


  1. Life and Death are in the Power of the Tongue?
  2. Associates | AIM Project.
  3. Sexually Harmful Behaviour | SpringerLink.

More support and advice. Online porn It's normal for young people to be curious about sex and relationships.

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Sexting How to talk to children about the risks of sexting - and what you can do to protect them. Childline Childline is our free, confidential helpline for children and young people. Donate now On average, a child contacts Childline every 25 seconds. Menu Menu Home What is child abuse? What we stand for Back Child protection in the UK Back Legal definitions of a child and their rights Parental mental health Parental substance misuse.

What you can do Back Report abuse Report abuse Back What to do if you suspect child abuse What to do if a child reveals abuse If a report's been made about you.



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